The inquest begins

It was England’s worst ever defeat in the finals of the World Cup.  Now an inquest begins that will rumble on for weeks and indeed months.   If England’s overall performance had not been so inept and the German win so well deserved the focus might have been on the wrongly disallowed goal.  There will still be discussion of the need for goallline technology, but Sepp Blatter has said no and Fifa is his personal fiefdom.

It was England’s worst ever defeat in the finals of the World Cup.  Now an inquest begins that will rumble on for weeks and indeed months.   If England’s overall performance had not been so inept and the German win so well deserved the focus might have been on the wrongly disallowed goal.  There will still be discussion of the need for goallline technology, but Sepp Blatter has said no and Fifa is his personal fiefdom.

Fabio Capello’s future will be discussed and in particular the decision by the Football Association to grant him a new contract just before the World Cup began.  If he is forced out, considerable compensation will have to be paid.   Once again the question will be: do the FA really know what they are doing?  No doubt they would argue there was a risk of him going to a big European club but with hindsight that might look like a risk that was worth taking.

The contest was also one between the Premiership model and the German Bundesliga.  The Premier League relies on mult-million pound earners who cost their clubs huge sums in wages and transfer fees and who never seem able to play as well for England as they do for their clubs.   In part this is often because England seems to be a team of individuals rather than a cohesive unit – but reliance on individualism, improvisation and, yes, indiscipline is very English.

Germany has its Nachwuchsleistungszentren (I think that’s right) academy system which costs the clubs €80m a year.  The system was set up to help clubs remain competitive without having to splash out on expensive players.  The Bundesliga claim that they have a balanced competition in which you can still earn very good money, play in front of big crowds and have the chance to appear in the Champions League.

For its part the Premier League argues that the Bundesliga got a boost from government-funded stadium development for the last World Cup.   They claim that despite recent tax increases they will continue to attract top international talent which will play before global television audiences.  They consider that clubs get little credit for the clubs’ investment-led model and funds redistributed to the Football League and non-league system.

One concern that may well be followed up is that Premier League players play too much football.  One can expect arguments for the winter break to surface again (probably after the lucratiive Christmas/New Year period) but also for a smaller Premier League.  And that would suit many Premiership clubs very well.

 

4 thoughts on “The inquest begins”

  1. England

    Not enough home grow talent in the prem, so a cap is needed on foreign players, any player who started a world cup game in SA should never be picked again, how the FA thinks that palyers who can’t read, write or put a sentance together can understand a manager who can’t speak english is beyond me! i bet the German players have far better qualifications than ours and their familys don’t live in caravans!

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    • England

      You can limit the number of players from outside the EU: they have to obtain work permits anyway and the conditions have become more restrictive and are likely to be more so in the future.   You cannot inhibit freedom of movement of labour in the EU as that is a fundamental breach of the Treaties and open to legal challenge.  I do not think that the clause on sport in the Lisbon Treaty overrides this.

      Reply
  2. The Failure of England at the World Cup: 23 reasons

    1. We were poorly prepared 2. Capello  was/is inflexible 3. Too many leaders in the 23 chosen 4. Inability to get used to the new ball. 5. A lack of skill. 6. A lack of stamina 7. Too many spoilt egos. 8. A poor working ethic 9. An inability to relax before and during a match 10. A lack of consistent forwards who are proven goal scorers. 11. An over reliance on Wayne Rooney 12. The media intrusions on the team 13. The sacking of John Terry as captain 14. The JT rebellion which did not materialise. 15. ‘The boredom’ factor mentioned by players signifying a lack of imagination 16. The Premier League being unable to work things out with the FA over winter breaks and compensation for players crocked while playing for England. 17. A lack of Footballing Academies 18. Insufficient pool of top quality eligible players. 19. The FA’s constant relaying of the pitch at Wembley 20. The commercial sponsorship deals which rule a players life 21. The salaries paid to footballers. 22. FIFA’s attitude to England in the shape of Sepp Blatter. 23. A lack of acclimitisation in South Africa prior to the first game.

     

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  3. The Supposed to be Equalizer

    I’ev been my friends that, if only Frank Lampard’s equalizer was allowed then everything in the game could have changed. Everyone saw how lousy their defense was during the first half. Who’s to blame? Upon observation on the first three games, once England got some grip and scores, there’s something about the so-called morale that changes the momentum of the game.

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