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Ben Hayes - Charlton Athletic programme

Television and Broadcasting

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Cup not about the money

The financial rewards of the FA Cup with Budweiser are limited, certainly at this stage of the competition.

When Rochdale played Sheffield Wednesday on Saturday they had a police bill of around £30,000. With 45 per cent of the gate receipts, they will make around £35,000.

If the game had been televised, they would have got an extra £144,000. However, the televised games tend to be those involving the clubs with the biggest number of fans. If they had won, they would have received £90,000.

Big battle over Italian TV rights

When Italy's cash-strapped soccer clubs meet today to prepare for a new deal on broadcast rights, their deliberations will be influenced by the knowledge that Italian football is in a dismal state and viewers are switching off.

A farcical match in the third division this month, which saw a local derby near Naples abandoned after players were threatened by fans and faked injury to avoid playing, underlined the grim climate in the Italian game, beset for years by match-fixing scandals and stadium violence.

Implications of BT deal sinking in

The implications of BT winning Champions League football are still sinking in. Whether it is a good deal for BT shareholders is a matter for discussion. Most Champions League matches are only a big attraction to the fans of the club involved. Sky say that they account for only 3 per cent of their viewership compared with 18 per cent for the Premier League.

BT's Champions League coup

BT is understood to have won the rights from Uefa to televise the Champions League and the Europa League for three years from 2015. Under the present deal worth £400m the lion's share of the games go to ITV rather than Sky.

BT is thought to have paid almost £1 billion, double what the former two companies paid to share the current contract in 2011. Uefa had hoped for £600m so its hopes have been exceeded. Some of the extra money will find its way into Champions League prizes, making the financial importance of qualification even greater.

TV revenue boosts Brazilian teams

Brazil's economy may be experiencing sluggish growth, but the country's football clubs are experiencing boom conditions. It's largely due to a growth in television revenues according to a study by bank Itaú BBA.

The revenues of Brazil's top 24 teams grew an average 32 per cent in 2012 to reach a total of almost $1.4bn. Since 2010 club revenue has grown consistently, on average at about 29 per cent a year.

Sky links up with Twitter

British Sky Broadcasting has teamed up with Twitter to share video highlights of Uefa Champions League football in real time. Sky's plan to share some of its most valuable sports clips free with social media users is a coup for Twitter.

Starting today with three Champions League games including Barcelona against Milan, the Sky Sports Twitter account will share highlights including instant replays of the best goals and post-match interviews. The aim of the project is to promote Sky's sports channels and its internet service Now TV.

BSkyB hit by battle with BT

Although BSkyB has taken a hit from its battle with BT, its quarterly results were better than expected. Even so, it has had to spend more on content and marketing. However, the real beneficiaries of the competition are top clubs who are likely to receive even more for televising their matches.

African leagues 'need to commercialise'

Globalisation in football marches on with the spread of commercial principles to all parts of the world. The need to commercialise the game will be at the forefront of this year’s Soccerex African Forum with Saer Seck, President, Senegal Professional Football League, Jack Oguda, CEO, Kenyan Premier League and Stanley Matthews Sports & Commercial Director for Africa, SuperSport, all speaking on the important subject in Durban at the beginning of October.

Roland Rat takes on the Premiership

Whatever one thinks about Greg Dyke, he has not had a boring life. He was the man who revived the fortunes of faltering breakfast television by introducing the character Roland Rat who was an instant hit with children.

Now, as head of the Football Association, he is taking on a rather tougher target in the form of the Barclays Premier League. When I say 'taking on', Dyke has made it clear that he is more than happy to work with the Premiership. However, his stance may well be seen as a threat to the interests of the Premier League.

Transfer window breaks all records

Player transfer spending by Premier League clubs in the summer 2013 transfer window was a record, according to analysis by Deloitte. Gross spending totalled £630m, 29% up on the equivalent 2012 figure of £490m and £130m more than the previous record of £500m set in 2008.