What about Liverpool?

In all the understandable excitement at Manchester City’s first title in 44 years, there has been little comment (outside Merseyside) on the fact that Liverpool lost 1-0 at promoted Swansea and finished 8th in the league.  

In all the understandable excitement at Manchester City’s first title in 44 years, there has been little comment (outside Merseyside) on the fact that Liverpool lost 1-0 at promoted Swansea and finished 8th in the league.  

They were one place behind rivals Everton who have been beset by financial problems, although of course the blue side of Liverpool lost the FA cup semi-final.  David Moyes played down the significance of their table position yesterday, but it just shows that a good manager can make a difference.   How long Moyes will stay at Goodison is a moot point.  If I was involved in Manchester United, I would be thinking of him as an eventual replacement for Sir Alex.

As for Liverpool, although their fans felt a real sense of injustice over the Su├írez affair, it did damage their reputation and diverted their energies.   They can polish the Carling Cup, but losing in the FA Cup final to Chelsea was a blow.

Liverpool FC has a fantastic football heritage and have been thought of as a top five club.   The stadium issue needs to be resolved once and for all.   Fenway Sports Group need to step up to the plate and bring out the dollars before the pound rises any higher.   Otherwise both Manchester clubs are going to pull further ahead.

For their part Everton also need investment but this has been evident for some time and no one has come in.  To the neutral the answer would be for the clubs to share a stadium from which they would both benefit, but while it would be a win-win that’s not the way it’s seen on Merseyside (although some fans do see the sense of it).