The challenge for Spurs

If Spurs are to maintain their effort to be a top four club in the long run, they need to increase their matchday revenue.    Chelsea earn almost twice as much as them from matchdays, Arsenal two-and-a-half times as much and Manchester United not far short of three times as much.  The constraint in improving Spurs’ revenue is the stadium which sells out.

If Spurs are to maintain their effort to be a top four club in the long run, they need to increase their matchday revenue.    Chelsea earn almost twice as much as them from matchdays, Arsenal two-and-a-half times as much and Manchester United not far short of three times as much.  The constraint in improving Spurs’ revenue is the stadium which sells out.


The Spurs chairman Daniel Levy has apparently ruled out redeveloping White Hart Lane which would increase capacity from 36,000 to 56,000 because of rising costs and outstanding planning and transport issues.


An important element in funding the £450m scheme would have been the sale of stadium naming rights.  But potential sponsors are concerned that a new stadium built on an existing site is likely to retain its traditional name in the public mind, reducing the amount they are prepared to pay.


Nearly half of Arsenal’s matchday revenue comes from corporate tickets which underlines Tottenham’s need for a solution to the transport issues.   Corporate fans want easy travel.  Hence the commercial attraction of moving the club from North to East London.