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"If you want some accessible but informative insight into football then I suggest you couldn't do better than the Political Economy of Football website, which is not only intelligible but comes with the added bonus of being written by Addicks fan Wyn Grant."
Ben Hayes - Charlton Athletic programme

Television and Broadcasting

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Palace dependent on tv revenue

The impressive Swiss Ramble blog has taken an in depth look at the finances of Crystal Palace and finds that they are more dependent on broadcasting revenue than any Premier League club which accounts for 82 per cent of their total revenue.   Admittedly, it accounts for 70 per cent or more of the revenue of half of the Premier League clubs.

Viewers only want to watch bigger teams

A paper published in the International Journal of Economics has claimed that as the money poured into football has grown, the demand from television viewers to watch the bigger teams has increased.   They prefer that to watching matches with uncertain outcomes.

New prime time deal for Football League

The Football League has signed a new three seasons deal for its highlights programme with Channel 5. The 90-minute programme, showing every single goal, will go out at 9 p.m. before the BBC's Match of the Day covering the Premier League.

New style television deal in Spain

Legislation has created a new form of arrangement for the sale of football television rights in Spain frm 2016.   At present clubs negotiate individual deals which has meant that a disproportionate share of revenue has gone to Barcelona and Real Madrid.

Who is a real fan?

In my view Simon Kuper writes some of the most interesting reflective essays about contemporary football. He surpassed himself with an article in last weekend's FT Magazine.   I'm not sure I agree with everything he said, but it is certainly thought provoking.

He starts with the notion that the whole idea of following a particular club is central to the personal identity of many fans.  Certainly when I think of my friends and acquaintances, I know which club they follow.  That includes the women, by the way.

What the Premiership is all about

The exit of Chelsea from the Champions League, and the poor prospects of Arsenal and Manchester City, provides another peg on which critics of the Premier League can hang one of their eloquent denunciations.  West Ham's income is poised to pass that of Inter Milan, but still Premier League teams under perform on the European stage.

David Conn and writers like him have a case to make, but sometimes I think they miss the point of the Premier League.   It is as much about creating a televised entertainment spectacle for global consumption as it is about football.

Players to wear embedded cameras

Spain's FirstVision has created a shirt to be worn by players with an embedded camera at chest level to provide broadcast standard video.   The device has been tested by players in training sessions at Barcelona and by officials in a match between Barcelona and Real Madrid.   The content was distributed by 150 broadcasters.

Sky customers will have to pay up

Sky customers will have to meet part of the cost of the new Premier League television rights deal.  Some reports suggest that subscriptions could go up by as much as £4 a month.

Sky has pledged to reduce its spending by a further £600m over three years, or 17 per cent of its addressable costs, to fund its bid.  Most savings will come from encouraging customers to make inquiries online, rather than phoning its customer call centres.

Unhappy days at Orient

Last season Leyton Orient were contenders for promotion.   This year they are bottom of League 1.  The Italian takeover of the club does not seem to have worked well.  Even team talks are being given in Italian.

In one bizarre development, the club has been given its own reality television show in Italy which could lead to a player contract.   Owner Francesco Becchetti thinks it will raise the profile of the club and perhaps produce good players.

Did Scudamore score an own goal?

There has been plenty of moral outrage at the amount of money coming into the Premier League under the new television deal and the amount of money being paid to its players.   One political economy blog has already asked me to write a suitably indignant piece which really be a less eloquent rendering of the kind of article that David Conn writes so well in The Guardian.