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"If you want some accessible but informative insight into football then I suggest you couldn't do better than the Political Economy of Football website, which is not only intelligible but comes with the added bonus of being written by Addicks fan Wyn Grant."
Ben Hayes - Charlton Athletic programme

Television and Broadcasting


The use of television to protest

Paul Breen discusses how fans are using live televised games to make a point.   At Middlesbrough, it was a 'Save Our Steel' campaign.   Elsewhere, Charlton and Leeds fans are increasingly cooperating over the mismanagement of their clubs with Addicks supporters hoping to make use of a live televised game against Ipswich Town on Saturday week.

Spain's third force

For a long time Spanish football has been dominated by a duopoly of Real Madrid and Barcelona.  The championship victory of Atl├ętico Madrid in 2013-14, along with their Champions League final, challenged that pattern.

$400m for Hong Kong Premiership rights

The Premier League has had increasing success in recent years in selling its television rights overseas, particularly in Asian markets.   Eventually the income received from viewers outside the UK will exceed the domestic revenue.

This trend is highlighted by the news that over $400m has been paid for the Premier League rights for Hong Kong.  LeTV have offered to pay more than double the $US200m paid by the previous rights holders.

Premier League becoming more dominant

The competitive imbalance in Europe caused by the Premier League's latest television deal is a theme that is drawing increasing attention and the latest person to address it is the sporting director of Wolfsburg. Of course, the deal hasn't kicked in yet, but the transfer dealings of leading Premiership clubs appear to anticipate it.

The trend to ban football journalists

Alex Thomson of Channel 4 News has been writing a series of blogs about the increasing trend of banning 'off message' football journalists from clubs.    Newcastle United and Swindon Town have been two of the worst offenders, but Rangers and Celtic have also got in on the act.

What a load of rubbish

Fans have been vociferous on social media criticising the new Channel 5 football highlights show.  Some fans had initially welcomed the change as the programme goes out at 9 p,m. rather than late at night after Match of the Day as was the case when it was on BBC.

The show has a studio audience who seem to add little to the show and indeed disrupt the flow.   One of them couldn't be heard last night because they didn't have a mike on him.

Sky gets mobile rights

Sky has bought the rights to show Premier League highlights on mobile devices, as it seeks to attract viewers beyond the TV set.   It will share the rights with The Times and The Sun both owned by Sky's major shareholder Rupert Murdoch through News Corp.   The two papers have 626,000 digital subscribers, compared with millions of sports customers at Sky.

Palace dependent on tv revenue

The impressive Swiss Ramble blog has taken an in depth look at the finances of Crystal Palace and finds that they are more dependent on broadcasting revenue than any Premier League club which accounts for 82 per cent of their total revenue.   Admittedly, it accounts for 70 per cent or more of the revenue of half of the Premier League clubs.

Viewers only want to watch bigger teams

A paper published in the International Journal of Economics has claimed that as the money poured into football has grown, the demand from television viewers to watch the bigger teams has increased.   They prefer that to watching matches with uncertain outcomes.

New prime time deal for Football League

The Football League has signed a new three seasons deal for its highlights programme with Channel 5. The 90-minute programme, showing every single goal, will go out at 9 p.m. before the BBC's Match of the Day covering the Premier League.