Skip to main content

"If you want some accessible but informative insight into football then I suggest you couldn't do better than the Political Economy of Football website, which is not only intelligible but comes with the added bonus of being written by Addicks fan Wyn Grant."
Ben Hayes - Charlton Athletic programme

Television and Broadcasting

Share/Save

European super league 'inevitable'

A European super league is 'iinevitable', according to Rangers manager Mark Warburton.  He is convinced that the globalisation of sport and an increasingly competitive TV rights market make it a certainty.

'If Bournemouih are competing with Bayern Munich for players it tells me that the market is skewed, and a European Super League can't be far away,' he told The Times.   'The big European clubs won't want to be left behind by smaller ones in England and if you're a broadcaster, which game would you rather show: Norwich v Leicester, or Arsenal v Rangers?'

Blackout rule under threat

Concern is being expressed about the possible removal of the 3pm broadcast blackout rule.   It is argued that it would reduce attendances at lower league and non-league clubs.

Such clubs consider that when they are up against midweek televised matches, attendances decrease. Of course, there are other factors involved such as work commitments and the lack of incentive to come out on a cold, dark night to a draughty ground.

PSG dominate French football

Paris Saint-Germain have a 24 point lead at the top of Ligue 1.  They remain unbeaten this season and they are almost certain to win the French title with more points that any other team in history.

It is now five years since the Qatar Investment Authority bought PSG, a deal that many belive was arranged by Nicolas Sarkozy, then the French president, and a PSG fan.   They were catapulted to the status of a super power in European football.

Cellino sues Football League over TV rights

Controversial Leeds United owner Massimo Cellino is bringing a legal action against the Football League over the collective selling of television rights.   The action arises from the League taking out an injunction to force Leeds to play Middlesbrough on Monday night.

New clamp down on streaming

Premier League officials are in talks with cyber-security companies in an effort to stop fans watching their matches on illegal online streams.

In recent years, the number of fans using the internet to stream games shown live by foreign broadcasters has risen sharply.   Some of the most popular broadcasters are in Australia, New Zealand and the United Arab Emirates.

United strike deal with film company

Manchester United have struck the first deal between a football club and a film company.   Major films from 20th Century Fox will be advertised in Premier League matches and in post-match interview backdrops.

Premier League games are broadcast to 730 million homes each week with Manchester United accounting for more than half of the league's global TV audience.   During the 2013-14 season the club's biggest match was watched by 82 million people, and it has estimated that its global audience for the season was 3 billion.

Free to air international matches cut back

It looks as is free to air broadcasting of international matches may be undermined with Sky poised to secure the rights for the new Uefa Nations League.   The new competition is set to launch in 2018.

It will divide national teams into leagues and will replace most friendly matches.   It is intended to tackle declining interest in international football outside of the major competitions.

United to launch Chinese tv channel

Manchester United will become the first football club to launch a dedicated 24 hour television channel in China next week, as it seeks to keep up with growing Chinese interest in the game.  Sina Sports, an online sports platform, will begin broadcasting the club's MUTV on its website, mobile site and app next Sunday.

Recent turbulence on the Chinese stock exchange and a fall in the country's interest has not dampened interest in the potential of the Chinese market for football.

Foreign rights bonanza for Premiership

Almost all the major deals for Premier League television deals are now done and the total looks like being around £3.2bn over three years.  This represents a 50 per cent increase on the corresponding figure for 2013-16.   When the Premier League started in 1992-3 the rights were worth £8m a year.

American investors steam in to English Football

Hard nosed American investors are replacing the oligarchs and egoists who have invested in English football over the last twenty years.   If the deal at Everton goes ahead, eight of the twenty Premier League clubs will have investors from the US.