Skip to main content

"If you want some accessible but informative insight into football then I suggest you couldn't do better than the Political Economy of Football website, which is not only intelligible but comes with the added bonus of being written by Addicks fan Wyn Grant."
Ben Hayes - Charlton Athletic programme

Share/Save

CSL clubs in financial trouble

Chinese Super League clubs are in financial disarray after splashing out on transfer fees for foreign players and their wages.   Gate money and merchandise generate little revenue compared to the amounts spent.

39th game back on agenda

Following the success of the Asia Trophy involving Premier League clubs, Premier League chief executive Richard Scudamore has revived the idea of a round of fixtures to be played abroad.

Richard Scudamore first advanced the idea in 2008, but it was dropped after a tidal wave of opposition from fans.   However, he thinks that there is now an increasing recognition from fans that the Premier League and its clubs are a global success story.

Spanish football chief arrested

The head of Spain's football federation was arrested yesterday in an investigation into suspected corruption by top officials.

Angel Maria Villar, his son Gorka Villar, and several Spanish federation executives were detained by Spanish police on suspicion of embezzlement, fraud and collusion. Mr Villar Snr, a former player for the Spanish national team, has been president of the federation for almost 30 years and is also a vice-president of Fifa and Uefa.

Keeping Sanchez is a long-term decision

Arsenal's refusal to sell Alexis Sanchez is influenced by long-term economic factors.  With Manchester City and Paris Saint-Germain interested, they could probably get £50m for him now, whereas they will receive nothing when his contract expires in a year's time.

Sanchez had indicated that he wanted to leave the club in an interview last weekend, citing a desire to play in the Champions League next season.

Why we haven't yet seen the £100m player

Paul Tomkins has taken a fascinating look at how football transfer fees in the past look like when they are expressed in 2017 prices.   Inflation has just about doubled since the formation of the Premier League in 1992 but the cost of a top rank footballer has gone up about twenty times.

EFL to revisit fit and proper persons test

The English Football League is to revisit its fit and proper persons test for club owners.   The specific stimulus appears to have been events at Leyton Orient, although protests at other clubs are also mentioned.

In particular, the EFL is looking at what happens to a club after it has been purchased.

Everton's Age of Austerity is over

Everton's age of austerity is over.    They were last among the big spenders in the late 1980s.  However, under new owner Farhad Moshiri they are targeting a top six finish and have splashed out £85m in the summer transfer window.

They have organised a £60m credit facility from the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China.

Football riches spread across Europe

The 26th Deloitte annual review of football finance reports that driven by continued growth in broadcast rights values in European football’s biggest leagues, and the impact of UEFA Euro 2016, total European football market revenues reached almost €25 billion in 2015/16, a 13% increase on 2014/15.

The ‘big five’ European leagues grew collective revenues by €1.4 billion (12%) in 2015/16, 59% of which was due to increased broadcast revenues, and 31% due to increased sponsorship and other commercial revenues.

Premier League clubs lose £876,000 a day

Vysyble has released the 2nd edition of its football finance report entitled ‘We’re So Rich It’s Unbelievable! – The Illusion of Wealth Within Football.’ The report covers the economic performance of the participant clubs in the English Premier League from 2008-9 to 2015-16 (the latest accounting period) ie 34 clubs. Over 260 individual club balance sheets were analysed as part of the research process.

Messi is first £1m a week player

Barcelona are to pay Lionel Messi a basic wage worth more than £1m a week.   Messi's gross salary under a four year contract has been set at an annual €60m (£54.8m).   If the contract runs for its full term Barca are committed to paying him £220m before performance bonuses.

Barcelona had total revenues of €620.2m (£548.6m at current exchange rates) in 2016, the second highest figure in football after Manchester United.  Last season the club budgeted for €695m of income and, according to its own analysis, Messi contributed 20 per cent of that figure.