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Ben Hayes - Charlton Athletic programme



Fan buy out law has its problems

Reference is sometimes made to the British equivalent of the 'California effect' in the United States.  This means that legislation pioneered in California is then adopted by other states or used as a model at a federal level.   Air quality law offers a good example.

The equivalent in the UK is the Scottish Parliament passing laws which might then be adopted elsewhere in the UK.   However, the 'Barnett formula' does ensure that the Scottish Government has more money to play with.

Clubs turn to learned counsel

We have often commented on the growing number of sports lawyers for whom football is an important and potentially lucrative area of work.   EU competition law is also highly relevant and it is often forgotten that the way in which Premier League television rights are sold in seven packages was a formula devised to satisfy the European Commission after an investigation.

QPR report substantially reduced losses

QPR have reported substantially reduced losses for the last financial year.   They are down to £9.8m in contrast to a massive £65.4m in the year ending May 2013.  Expenditure is down £22m, largely due to lower player costs.   Shareholders have also written off £60m in loans.

The club has faced difficulties over compliance with financial fair play rules, but these results should help their position.  

Yeung deals Blues a blow from his prison cell

I am sometimes surprised by what it is possible to do from a prison cell if you have the right connections, although, of course, the fact that someone is imprisoned does not deprive them of recourse to the courts, at least not in Hong Kong.

Obstacle to Spurs stadium plans removed

A major obstacle to Tottenham Hotspur's plans to redevelop White Hart Lane into a 21st century stadium has been removed.   A family firm lost an attempt in the High Court to quash a compulsory purchase order issued against them.   

Sisu suffer setbacks in the courts

Coventry City's owners Sisu have suffered further setbacks in their battle in the courts over the Ricoh Arena.   Their appeal against a refusal of a judicial review of a loan by Coventry City Council to the stadium's operators, Arena Coventry Limited, has been rejected and, what is more, the judge ticked off their laywers over the nature of their application.

More troubles at Birmingham City

What has been described as the 'soap opera' at Birmingham City has taken a new twist.   The club has revealed that £2.55m may have been misappropriated by a former employee from the parent company Birmingham International Holdings Limited.   Shares in the Hong Kong based company were suspended six weeks ago and trading will not be resumed until further notice.

The transfer window

Sports lawyer Daniel Geey takes an interesting and in depth look at the transfer window.   He argues against the conventional wisdom by making a defence of football agents.

Carson Yeung refused bail

Birmingham City majority shareholder Carson Yeung has been refused bail ahead of an appeal against his conviction for money laundering to be held in March.   He does have some hopes of success in the appeal.

In another twist, a mystery individual has bought a large stake in the club and it could be Yeung's common law wife.

Last chance saloon for Hereford

The winding up order against Hereford United has been adjourned once again.   This is the ninth adjournment.   They have until Friday to prove that they have £1m to pay creditors.

Owner Andy Lonsdale has said that it will be 'sorted' by Friday afternoon when the hearing resumes.  That remains to be seen.